Based on three studies (review and analysis of 52 awareness and fundraising activities’ evaluations from a variety of fields, meta-analyses on success factors of awareness raising campaigns and seven case studies of effective practices in 7 ELINET member organisations) Team 8 has developed an overview of indicators for success concerning awareness raising and fundraising for low literacy in Europe. You can find the report of each study at this page.

Indicators for evaluation of awareness and fundraising for low literacy in Europe: Research review

By Ivana Ceneric, Janet Looney and Maurice de Greef

In line with the objectives outlined in the initial Call for a “European Policy Network of National Literacy Organisations” and activities defined Team 8 of the ELINET network, the team has reviewed alternative methodologies to evaluate campaign to raise awareness- and funds for programmes for individuals with low literacy. Indeed, while literacy organisations across Europe have implemented awareness- and fundraising activities at national and local levels, we know little about their impact. The lack of an effective evaluation methodology for this field has hindered understanding of effective approaches to reaching different target audiences. There is no general agreement on what constitutes effective, efficient and coherent approach to awareness- and fundraising activities.


Therefore, to define an appropriate methodology and indicators to be included in the ELINET toolkit for literacy organisations, ELINET Team 8 conducted a review and analysis of 52 awareness and fundraising activities’ evaluations from a variety of fields. These included evaluations in the area of public health, education (in areas other than literacy), mass media and marketing and using different methodologies. As awareness- and fundraising campaigns in different fields have similar goals, namely to ensure that more people are aware of a specific challenge and of the actions they may take to address that challenge (or to inspire them to make a financial contribution), we can draw inspiration from them. We may also learn from their experiences in planning and implementation. This research review provided some first insights about possible indicators for awareness and fundraising for low literacy in Europe.

The key features of successful awareness raising campaigns

By Laura Masiulienė, Janet Looney, Hanne Aertgeerts and Maurice de Greef

Awareness raising campaigns can be defined as organised communication activities which aim to create awareness on particular topics (health, environment, education), behavioural change among the general population and to improve the focus on better outcomes (better health, greater environmental protection, reduced early school leaving). They often take the form of mass media campaigns. Messages can be conveyed through many different channels, such as mass media (television, radio), social media, public relations, events, talks, demonstrations, tours and leaflets. Awareness raising campaigns are recognised as the most efficient and effective means of communicating information especially to the general public. Still, not all of them are effective in terms of influencing people’s beliefs and changing their behaviour. Therefore, in order to establish and develop a successful awareness-raising campaign for low literacy in Europe, it is crucial to know the features of successful campaigns.

This report contributes to deepening this knowledge by bringing together findings from meta-analyses on success factors of awareness raising campaigns in different fields, in particular in adult education and health.

The current report is based on the desk research conducted by the ELINET team 8 for the report “Indicators for evaluation of awareness and fundraising for low literacy in Europe: Research Review” (Ceneric et al., 2014). In line with the objectives outlined in the initial Call for a “European Policy Network of National Literacy Organisations” and defined activities, Team 8 earlier reviewed alternative methodologies to evaluate awareness- and fundraising campaign activities. The current report provides a further more in-depth analysis of meta-studies identified during the desk research conducted for the above mentioned report in order to identify and describe more detailed key success factors for awareness raising campaigns.

Success factors for awareness and fundraising for literacy in Europe

By Hanne Aertgeerts, Maurice de Greef, Janet Looney and Laura Masiulienė

Team 8 of the ELINET network has conducted seven case studies of effective practices in 7 ELINET member organisations. These case studies focused on the processes of awareness- and fundraising for low literacy in these member organisations and among policy makers in Europe. One of the main goals of Team 8 (as part of the ELINET network) is to draw on the results of these case studies and the literature review to develop a detailed list of detailed list of indicators (and examples), which can possibly be used in order to develop successful awareness or fundraising campaigns for low literacy. Team 8 has developed an overview and analysis of indicators for success along with the description of the different case studies and pilots concerning awareness and fundraising for low literacy in Europe.

Ultimately, each campaign should be tailored to the local context and target audience. The common elements of success identified in this report provide a framework for campaign development and implementation. These elements serve as general principles to guide each campaign, rather than as a rigid set of rules or a recipe. The indicators, which should be clearly linked to each campaign’s goals and strategy, provide information on whether campaigns are meeting their goals and areas where improvements may be needed.

Influence Strategies: Approaches to influencing long-term change

By Janet Looney in co-operation with Maurice de Greef

In this paper, we step back to explore why and how campaigns for literacy and other influence strategies can lead to deeper changes in attitudes and behaviours. For example, in the field of literacy, what influences an adult with low-level literacy skills to face personal barriers and invest time and energy in further learning? What influences the parent to take time to read with their children every day, or the busy physician to discuss the importance of literacy skills for health and well-being with patients? We’ll describe some of the important concepts related to ‘social marketing’ and ‘social learning’, and evidence on the impact of different approaches. At the same time, there’s a real need to build the research base in the area of literacy on what works, for whom, and under what circumstances. In the final section of the paper, we’ll also point to gaps in what is known about what works and the need for literacy organisations to engage in action research, including evaluation of the impact of different strategies.